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Best circular knitting needles 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated November 1, 2018
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Kyle DunnHi, I’m Kyle Dunn. After putting in 55+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best circular knitting needles of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

Eventually, I found something that would suit my needs but it occurred to me that I wasn’t the only one who might be having the same problems I did. We take a close look at some of the best circular knitting needles to help you get ripped.

Best circular knitting needles of 2018

If you’re scouring the market for the best circular knitting needles, you’d better have the right info before spending your money. The rating is based on multiple factors: The 3 metrics ‐ Design, Materials, Performance, and other indicators such as: Popularity, Opinions, Brand, Reputation and more. Simply review and buy them. Following is the list of top three circular knitting needles of 2018.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Style
5 points
5 points
4 points
Materials
4 points
5 points
4 points
Construction
5 points
4 points
4 points
Value
5 points
4 points
5 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the circular knitting needles by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – TOVOT 18 PCS 2.0 mm-10 mm 16 inch (40 cm )Circular Bamboo Knitting Needle set

 
TOVOT 18 PCS 2.0 mm-10 mm 16 inch (40 cm )Circular Bamboo Knitting Needle set

Pros
Material: Bamboo,PE pipe
Size:2.0 mm 2.25 mm 2.5 mm 2.75 mm 3.0 mm 3.25 mm 3.5 mm 3.75 mm 4.0 mm 4.5 mm 5.0 mm ,5.5 mm 6.0 mm 6.5 mm 7.0 mm 8.0 mm 9.0 mm 10.0 mm
Suitable for knitting the current popular Korean version of the collar and large pieces of carpet,
Cons
For such a price and the level of quality it can’t even have any cons, only pick holes.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this circular knitting needles win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! The material is stylish, but it smells for the first couple of days.

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Style
5

5star

Materials
4

4star

Construction
5

5star

Value
5

5star

 

 

№2 – Knit Picks TRY IT Interchangeable Knitting Needle Set – Caspian Wood and Nickel Plated Tips

 
Knit Picks TRY IT Interchangeable Knitting Needle Set - Caspian Wood and Nickel Plated Tips

Pros
Needles Included: one set of size 6 (4mm) Caspian wood interchangeable tips, one set of size 7 (4.5mm) Nickel Plated interchangeable tips
Green Accessories Included: one 24″ Cable, one 40″ Cable, four End Caps, and one Cable Key
Needle Tips are 4 3/4″ in length, cable measurements are total length when attached to tips
Cons
A bit expensive for functionality.
A little bit shallow.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this circular knitting needles come in second place?

The material is pretty strong and easy to wash if needed. I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office.

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Style
5

5star

Materials
5

5star

Construction
4

4star

Value
4

4star

 

 

№3 – Knit Picks Options Interchangeable Caspian Circular Knitting Needle Set

 
Knit Picks Options Interchangeable Caspian Circular Knitting Needle Set

Pros
Includes needle tips in US Sizes: 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,10.5,11 (3.5, 3.75, 4, 4.5, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 8mm)
Included accessories: 2 cables each in both 24” and 32” lengths, 8 end caps and 2 cable keys
9″ x 5.5″ vinyl case with snap shut closure stores all included needles, cables, and accessories
Cons
Not suited for novices.
The price might be something to consider for some.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this circular knitting needles take third place?

I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials.

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Style
4

4star

Materials
4

4star

Construction
4

4star

Value
5

5star

 

 

circular knitting needles Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy circular knitting needles, right? No!

Economy

Investing in a set of interchangeable knitting needles is a commitment to the next few years of your knitting pleasure. Our experience has shown us that most likely purchasers of interchangeable sets are late beginning-to-intermediate knitters looking to prepare themselves for a variety of projects and yarns. Our recommendations below are geared towards those knitters needing an all-around needle set, including some upgrades for knitters with more specific needs.

How to choose an interchangeable knitting needle set

Other factors include the tip profile, material and finish, price, warranty, and what you’ll be knitting. We’ve evaluated over a dozen different sets against these critera to come up with our picks for you. We’ll go into greater depth on selecting a needle based on material (metal, wood, bamboo, or resin) in a future guide. Most interchangeable sets connect by screwing the threaded end of the flexible cable into the base of the needle until tight. Where the needles meet the cables is called the “join”, and it’s important to inspect joins to make sure they are smooth, so that yarn will slide over easily without catching, and sturdy, as the join endures a lot of force throughout it’s knitting lifetime.

Don’t lose your work with a secure cable connector

We’re particularly fond of the Addi-style keyless spring-twist connector. Rather than screwing in (and gradually unscrewing through use) like most interchangeable sets, the Addi line connects with a push-and-twist method similar to a child safety cap on a medicine bottle, and stays securely connected until you again push and twist to release. The Addi interchangeable cables are a soft light blue that loosens quickly and doesn’t coil up while you’re working “Magic Loop” style on small projects, with a smooth join where the cable meets the metal connector. While not the most flexible cable we’ve tested, the Addi cables perform very admirably.

Don’t lose your keys

We also find the need for an additional key to tighten and loosen the screw-in connections to be a small inconvenience, as the keys can go missing at inopportune times, keeping your needles hostage until you replace the key. That said, most interchangeable sets require a key or grip to tighten or loosen the needles, and plenty of knitters improvise with paperclips and the like. due to the fine quality of the needles and cables; so if the connector sizes are no inconvenience to you, the set is very well-priced for its craftsmanship. You can’t go wrong with either set.

The competition

We mention the HiyaHiya Sharps in contrast to the ChiaoGoo Red Lace as a sharper stainless steel needle. In fact, the HiyaHiya’s are even sharper, so we’d only recommend them for very accurate knitters and those knitting lace or socks.

The ubiquitous Boye Interchangeable needles also got poor reviews from knitters due to the stiffer cable and rough joins, as well as quality issues. You may also notice we don’t recommend any bamboo needles in this guide. Bamboo needles aren’t wildly popular with knitters as our other picks, due to very dull tips and a sticky surface that really grabs the yarn. We’ve also had bad luck with bamboo needles breaking and splintering, and aren’t convinced that they’re sturdy enough to rely on.

A circular needle is like two double-pointed needles that are connected together by a long cable, which is usually made of plastic. Because you can fit lots of stitches onto that cable, a circular needle is ideal for knitting pieces with larger circumferences, like the toys in my upcoming book. The configuration of the stitches on a circular needle is simple: you knit from one end of the needle to the other in a continuous spiral.

Straight Needles shine with intarsia

The cables for interchangeable knitting needles are usually available in various lengths, starting at around 40cm (16″) and increasing through to around 150cm (60″). Which length to choose depends on the project being knitted, however remember that the great thing about this type of knitting needle is that the length can be adjusted using different cables, or joining multiple cables together.

Most patterns will identify which length circular needles are suggested. Combining and switching cables with the required knitting needles can save a knitter from having to purchase new sized circular needles every time they start a new project.

Longer cables (greater than 90cm) are typically used for heavy or larger projects most common knitted in the round, such as sweaters and jackets or flat knitted projects including large shawls and blankets.

Medium length cables (60cm – 90cm) can be used for mid-size projects, also knitted flat or larger tube knitting projects, like shawls and bigger scarves.

Shorter cables (up to 50cm) would be used for smaller projects requiring tube knitting, including hats, children’s scarves and headbands.

Choosing the Needle Tip Size

Before we get to selecting the right size, it is important to note that the size of a needle refers to the diameter of the thickest part of the needle tip.

Much like the length of the cable, the size of the needle tips will depend on the project you are intending to knit, and more specifically on the weight of the yarn you will be knitting with (and even your style of knitting if you want to get technical). Most knitting patterns and yarn specifications will provide a guide as to the recommended size of needles to use.

To truely assess which size needle is appropriate for your project, it is best to knit a small 10cm test patch with the yarn you intend to use. From this patch you will be able to count the gauge (or tension) of your project. The gauge refers to the number of stitches or rows required to knit a 10cm section of garment. A knitter’s gauge is a combination of their style, the needles used and yarn selected. Once the yarn is selected, the needle size is the only true variable in a project. Thus a test patch can determine if the needle size (and thus gauge) is right for you to easily follow the measurements in your knitting pattern.

Given this natural variation between knitters, it can be useful to purchase a set of interchangeable knitting needles, so that you have a range of sizes on hand should you need to swap sizes.

For a useful guide on which size to choose with each weight of yarn, please refer to our Yarn Size Chart, remembering that the best way to select needle size is by knitting a test patch before commencing your project.

Choosing Material

Interchangeable Knitting Needles are available in a range of materials, including Metal, Wood and Plastic. Each material is more appropriate for different knitters and generally, the preferred material is down to personal preference. This makes it hard to say that any material is “better” or “worse” than another, or more or less appropriate.

For this reason, we have created an entire (albeit brief) buying guide to help you select you Knitting Needle Material.

Cast all the stitches onto one double pointed needle. Try to cast on somewhat loosely, so that the stitches are able to slide freely on the needle.

Knitting with Double Pointed Needles

Having knit across all the stitches of the first needle, that needle becomes free to knit the stitches of the next needle. For example, the green needle knit all of the stitches of the yellow needle, freeing the yellow needle to now knit the stitches of the pink needle.

Materials

What your knitting needle is made out of is based mostly on personal taste and how much you want to spend. Basic needles are available in metal, plastic and wood, and you will probably be able to find all three at your local craft shop.

Other possibilities include bamboo, glass and resins. These needles may not be available at your local craft store, but you can find them at knitting stores or online.

Metal Needles

Metal knitting needles are some of the most commonly available knitting needles today. They are usually made from aluminum and are relatively inexpensive. They are heavy and strong, able to support a big project, and they are nearly impossible to break. Other materials used in metal needles are chrome, brass and nickel.

The downside to metal needles is that they are cold, and they make a clicking sound when you knit, which some crafters find annoying. They’re also quite slick, which can be a problem when knitting with very fine or smooth yarn.

Plastic Needles

Plastic knitting needles are the least expensive needles and are great for beginners. They are lightweight and durable, and have a little more flexibility than metal needles. They are still somewhat noisy, but not as loud as metal needles. Plastic needles are very smooth, which some knitters find helps them to knit more quickly. Some of the very large knitting needles can only easily be found in plastic, so it’s likely you’ll end up with some plastic needles in your stash.

Wooden Needles

Wooden needles are a perennial favorite among knitters. The main reason for their popularity is their warmth. The heat of your hands warms the needles, making them a joy to work with. There’s also more tactile pleasure from knitting with wooden needles. Wooden needles tend to be smooth but not too slippery, so they are good for knitters of all skill levels. They can be expensive, especially those that are handmade. They are also more brittle than other types of needles and can be broken.

Choosing the Right Needle

Knowing what size needle to use can be a little tricky. When you pick out a pattern, it will indicate what size needle was used to make the item. But every person knits a little differently, and you probably knit more tightly or loosely on different days, as well. This is where gauge comes in. Almost all patterns include a statement of gauge that will say something like “gauge is four stitches and four rows to one inch on size 1needles.” What this means is if you knit in the stitch pattern that is indicated in the pattern, when you have knitted four stitches for four rows you will have a one-inch square of knitting.

You should always check your gauge, but if you can’t be bothered, at least check your gauge on garments that need to fit properly. It’s less crucial on things like scarves and throws.

If you knit a swatch the size recommended and measure it and come out the right size, congratulations. You should knit the item on those needles. If your swatch is too small, that is you have more stitches and rows to the inch than required, try again with larger needles. If your swatch is bigger, meaning fewer stitches fit in an inch that the pattern says, try smaller needles.

You might need to go up or down a size or two to get the right gauge. It’s important to take the time to do this so you won’t spend all that time knitting only to end up with something that’s not the shape or size it was supposed to be.

Your Collection

When you first start knitting, you will probably only have a couple different kinds of needles. You’ll buy new ones as you need them and ultimately end up with a hodgepodge of needles of different sizes and materials, straights and circulars, all stuffed in a box or a drawer.

If you can no longer tell what size your needles are, invest in a gauge ruler. This handy little metal ruler helps you measure gauge without keeping a measuring tape in your knitting bag, but it also includes holes of different sizes that will help you size knitting needles. It works like a spaghetti measure, just slide the needle in the hole and the one it fits in snugly will show you the size of the needle.

In the future, try to organize your needles. You can make a needle holder for your straight needles and organize them by size, or dedicate a box, basket or drawer. Put all the needles of the same size in a zip-top bag and label it with the size. Then make sure you put them back when you’re finished.

Interchangeable Needles

Another option for keeping control over your needles is to buy a set of interchangeable needles. This is a set, usually of circular needles, that includes points of various sizes. You can attach different points to the same cord, so you have a whole set of circulars that comes in its own storage box.

The Boye Needlemaster by Wrights is the most widely available interchangeable system and has been around the longest. It includes needle points from size to 1and cords to make lengths of 20, 24, 2and 3inches. You could probably also join two cords together to make longer cords. The points are metal and the cords are plastic. The points screw into the cords (there’s a little tool like a bent paperclip that is supposed to make the points stay secure on the cords) and they are all different colors, which makes it easier to tell them apart.

Another popular interchangeable system is the Denise Interchangeable Knitting System. These were actually developed by the same people who originally designed the Boye system, so they’re kind of a next-generation product.

They’re made of resin and are much lighter than traditional knitting needles. this set is interesting because it allows you to make both circular and straight needles with the same points. The sizes range from to 1and you can make straight needles that are 9, 13, 16, 20, 30 or 3inches long (with the points added) or circulars measuring 17, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 33, 40, 50 or 5inches.

A new set on the scene is Options from Knit Picks. These needles are nickel-plated, so they are very smooth. The needles can be purchased as a kit (with US sizes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10.and 11, as well as two lengths of cable) or separately. Sizes 13, 1and 1are also available, as well as three other lengths of circular cable. The needles themselves are not labeled by size, but needle markers and a needle gauge are available from Knit Picks as well.

Crotchet hooks can be used for so many things. Not only will you have all the tools necessary to learn how to crotchet, but they will save your knitting on so many occasions. The two biggest reasons to get them, though, are 1) to fix dropped stitches, and 2) to weave in ends. You can do both of these things in other ways, but using a crotchet hook is the easiest. At least for me.

So what are the best knitting needles for beginners? When you’re just getting started with knitting, it can be hard to know exactly what you like. Lucky for you, we’ve put together this handy guide to making the right choice for you.

Our best piece of advice for shopping for your first pair of knitting needles is to ask a friend to try theirs first. Until you know exactly the types of needles that work best in your hands, why invest tons of money in needles that you may or may not like.

Choosing the Length

When shopping for your first pair of knitting needles, the length is probably the first thing you’ll want to take into consideration. It’s easy to disregard needle length because it’s the size (or diameter) that really makes a difference when it comes to the finished product.

Length is one of the biggest comfort factors with needles. Often longer needles are cumbersome and can be challenging to use for beginners! If you’re new to knitting, try out different lengths to see what suits your hands best.

As a rule of thumb: shorter is probably better for beginners.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the circular knitting needles by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your circular knitting needles wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of circular knitting needles

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about circular knitting needles is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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